Tuesday, February 21, 2017
Source:
Science 2.0

It’s not hard these days to find stories in the popular media about the presence of various chemical contaminants in our environment.  Included in this genre are stories about trace levels of chemicals in common consumer products, in the air we breathe, and in the water we drink.  Almost inevitably the stories suggest that even minor exposures are harming our health. 

Monday, January 9, 2017
Source:
American Chemistry Council

More than 10 years ago, bisphenol A (BPA) was a hot topic in Japan. But these days, not so much. The Japanese government ministries with responsibility for human health continue to monitor scientific developments on BPA in the rest of the world, but without any apparent pressure or need for regulatory action. Likewise, there’s little or no attention to BPA from Japanese consumers or in the media.
What could account for the difference between Japan and other countries where interest in BPA continues, sometimes with a very high level of intensity? Could it be that the Japanese government and people have listened to the science on BPA?

Wednesday, December 21, 2016
Source:
The Conversation

Those making the traditional green bean casserole over the holidays might see a label on their can of green beans or mushroom soup that reads, “BPA-free lining.” BPA, or bisphenol A, is an industrial chemical used to make plastics and resins, which are often used in containers that store food and beverages.
Specifically, most metal food and beverage cans have a thin interior coating that contains BPA. This coating protects the can from corrosion, and as a result, prevents contamination from dissolved metals or life-threatening bacteria. We can probably all agree that nobody is hoping for a side of botulism with their holiday meal.

Monday, December 19, 2016
Source:
Washington Post

If you worry about risks to your health from cellphones, genetically modified foods or any of the many threats that pop into the news, reading cancer epidemiologist Geoffrey C. Kabat’s new book may allay some of your fears by putting the headlines in perspective. But reassuring you is not Kabat’s sole mission.

Tuesday, December 6, 2016
Source:
American Chemistry Council

If you live in Austria, should you be concerned about exposure to bisphenol A (BPA)?  Not according to the results of a new study from Austrian government researchers that was just published in the peer-reviewed scientific literature.

Monday, November 28, 2016
Source:
Science 2.0

A recent study from French government researchers reported new results on the exposure of pregnant women to more than 100 substances that might be a concern for the health of a developing fetus.  The study examined exposure to various metals (e.g., lead, mercury, arsenic) and many common organic compounds that we might encounter in our daily lives.

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