Monday, November 28, 2016
Source:
Science 2.0

A recent study from French government researchers reported new results on the exposure of pregnant women to more than 100 substances that might be a concern for the health of a developing fetus.  The study examined exposure to various metals (e.g., lead, mercury, arsenic) and many common organic compounds that we might encounter in our daily lives.

Monday, November 28, 2016
Source:
Times Higher Education

Scholars of scientific hype in the modern age typically point their finger at the media, the internet and, above all, the gullibility of the science-illiterate general public. While these elements do clearly play their part, cancer epidemiologist Geoffrey Kabat is more interested in blaming a more unlikely enabler: scientists themselves.

Friday, November 4, 2016
Source:
American Chemistry Council

With so much scientific review of bisphenol A (BPA) having already taken place, you might think that there would be little to learn from further review.  Numerous government bodies around the world have recently reviewed the science on BPA and independently reached similar conclusions on its safety.  But if you thought there’s nothing new under the sun, you’d be wrong.
 
A group of Greek scientists recently published their assessment of BPA in the peer-reviewed scientific literature and concluded that “exposure to BPA does not pose any significant threat according to most realistic exposure scenarios.”  This isn’t exactly a new conclusion.  For example, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), based on its assessment, answers the question “Is BPA safe?” with the straightforward answer “Yes.”  Similarly, the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) concluded that “BPA poses no health risk to consumers of any age group (including unborn children, infants and adolescents) at current exposure levels.”

Wednesday, October 19, 2016
Source:
Science 2.0

Not that many years ago, many reusable food and beverage containers on the market worldwide were made from polycarbonate plastic.  Polycarbonate, which is made from bisphenol A (BPA), is an almost ideal material for these products since its clarity is comparable to glass, making it easy to see what’s inside, and it’s virtually shatter-proof – an important attribute for consumer products that could be dropped.
 
For years though, BPA has attracted considerable attention from scientists, environmental activists and the media.  Now, as a result of that attention, few of these products are made from polycarbonate and a variety of alternative materials are used instead.

Tuesday, October 11, 2016
Source:
American Chemistry Council

The topic of endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) has been popular lately with many “experts” weighing in with their opinions on everything from the basic definition of EDCs to what to do about them.  With scientific issues like this, the words attributed to Daniel Patrick Moynihan bear repeating:  “everyone is entitled to his own opinion, but not his own facts.”
 
A recent example is an article in the online publication MedPage Today titled “EDCs: An Area of Growing Concern,” and subtitled “Expert: too little testing of BPA, phthalates.”  While the article focused on comments from an “expert,” it would have benefited immensely from some editorial fact-checking.

Wednesday, September 7, 2016
Source:
Science 2.0

With the high level of attention to bisphenol A (BPA) over the years, it’s easy to get the impression that BPA is everywhere and we’re constantly being exposed to high and harmful levels in our daily lives.  You might even have seen BPA referred to as an “everywhere chemical.”   
Adding to the confusion, the media is notorious for attaching pictures of products that contain absolutely no BPA to articles about BPA.  Perhaps the most common examples are pictures of bottled water.  Single-serve bottles containing water, sports drinks or carbonated beverages are almost universally made from a plastic known as polyethylene terephthalate (PET), which has no connection to BPA at all.

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