Wednesday, August 24, 2016
Source:
American Chemistry Council

Many of today’s consumer products are safer and more effective, thanks to bisphenol A (BPA). Every day we benefit from clear, shatter-resistant polycarbonate plastic and tough epoxy resins, both made from BPA.
From eyeglass lenses to bicycle helmets, and security shields to life-saving medical devices, polycarbonate makes our lives more livable. Almost invisibly, epoxy resin coatings protect metal surfaces from degradation and support food safety by protecting canned foods from contamination.

Monday, August 15, 2016
Source:
American Chemistry Council

The Finnish Institute of Occupational Health and the National Institute for Health and Welfare recently released a report on exposure of hairdressers to several chemicals, one of which was bisphenol A (BPA). First for the bottom line: “According to the results, hairdressers in Finland are not exposed to…bisphenol A…any more than the rest of the population.”

Wednesday, August 3, 2016
Source:
Science 2.0

Based on a recent and fascinating scientific report from Switzerland, you might start to hear demands to eliminate mild mustard from our diet. The Swiss Federal Food Safety and Veterinary Office (FSVO) recently reported that mild mustard contains the chemical bisphenol F (BPF). Remarkably, BPF is not a contaminant introduced from packaging or other sources, but apparently is produced from a component naturally present in mustard seeds when the seeds are processed to make mustard.

Friday, July 15, 2016
Source:
Science 2.0

It is commonly perceived that natural chemicals are safe while manmade substances may be harmful.  These perceptions, however, if not supported by scientific evidence, can result in risk perception gaps that can cause us to worry more than warranted by the evidence.

Friday, July 15, 2016
Source:
American Chemistry Council

Last week a flurry of news stories reported on a new study of bisphenol A (BPA) in canned foods led by a researcher at Stanford University. Based on an analysis of BPA levels in urine and self-reported canned food consumption, the researchers came to the conclusion that “[c]anned food[s] … were associated with higher levels of urinary BPA concentrations.” But the study missed the point: yes, we know BPA is present in trace amounts, but is it safe?

Monday, June 6, 2016
Source:
The Sweethome

You can find alarmist warnings about BPA, a demonized chemical, in every nook and cranny on the Internet: it’s an endocrine disruptor, it can give you diabetes, breast cancer, or ADHD, among other things. It has a long and confusing rap sheet, and a lot of this stuff is really scary and people don’t know what to believe...

...That being said, health risks from BPA seems to be very, very small (remember: far-away sharks). There are many other things that are a much higher health risk, such as eating poorly, not getting enough exercise, riding in a car (especially if you’re a kid), or swimming in pools with hungry sharks. But if you’re still worried about being bitten, go for the (liningless) stainless steel.

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