Friday, May 15, 2015
Source:
Maclean's

If there are three letters that strike fear in the hearts of Canadian parents, it’s BPA. But, in a recent paper in the Canadian Journal of Political Science, Wilfrid Laurier professor Simon Kiss argues that Health Canada’s decision to classify BPA as toxic in 2008 was the result of political and cultural factors, not because science shows it’s unsafe.
 
Bisphenol A, or BPA, is a synthetic compound that’s been in use since the 1950s. An additive to harden clear plastics, it’s also in the paper that receipts are printed on, and in the lining of food cans. Most of us have detectable traces of it in our urine. However, whether BPA has any effect on humans at typical exposure levels is deeply controversial, even among scientists.

Wednesday, April 29, 2015
Source:
National Review

An increasingly frequent and worrisome phenomenon that unnecessarily threatens human health and the natural environment is “regrettable substitutions,” which refers to bans or limitations on certain products, even though the alternatives might pose risks that are uncertain or greater. It calls to mind the old saying “out of the frying pan and into the fire.” Today, members of the Senate Environment and Public Works Committee are marking up legislation to reform the nation’s law on chemicals — the Toxic Substances Control Act. As they work, they should heed the lessons related to regrettable substitutions.

Thursday, April 23, 2015
Source:
American Chemistry Matters

Parents have been concerned about the potential health effects of bisphenol A (BPA) on their children for years, based in no small part on scary headlines that have been heavily promoted. Surely parents would be interested, even relieved, to know that their concerns are not well founded.

Importantly, a new study helps to put concerned parents at ease about the health of their newborn children. As the latest study’s authors stated in a news release, the “risk [of BPA] to newborns may be smaller than previously believed.” The study found that newborns are able to efficiently metabolize and eliminate BPA from the body in the same way as adults.

Thursday, March 19, 2015
Source:
American Chemistry Matters

Consumers can have confidence in the safety of BPA.

In recent months, several leading government bodies around the globe have made clear statements in support of the safety of bisphenol A (BPA) as it is used in consumer products. These are not merely opinions, but are sound conclusions backed up by comprehensive reviews of the extensive scientific literature on BPA. Of particular significance are the results of an in-depth research program on BPAconducted by U.S. government scientists at the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and other agencies.

Wednesday, March 11, 2015
Source:
American Chemistry Matters

“No health risk for consumers from Bisphenol A exposure,” reads the headline on a recent announcement. That headline says it all as German scientific experts listened to the science and endorsed the recent conclusions of the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA).

Wednesday, March 11, 2015
Source:
Forbes

Many supposedly health-conscious consumers who choose products with labels like “BPA-Free” or "non-GMO" may be getting less than they bargained for. Not only are many of the scary sounding ingredients perfectly safe, but in their eagerness to meet consumer demand, manufacturers sometimes substitute ingredients or processes that prove to be inferior or actually harmful.

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