Monday, December 19, 2016
Source:
Washington Post

If you worry about risks to your health from cellphones, genetically modified foods or any of the many threats that pop into the news, reading cancer epidemiologist Geoffrey C. Kabat’s new book may allay some of your fears by putting the headlines in perspective. But reassuring you is not Kabat’s sole mission.

Tuesday, December 6, 2016
Source:
American Chemistry Council

If you live in Austria, should you be concerned about exposure to bisphenol A (BPA)?  Not according to the results of a new study from Austrian government researchers that was just published in the peer-reviewed scientific literature.

Monday, November 28, 2016
Source:
Science 2.0

A recent study from French government researchers reported new results on the exposure of pregnant women to more than 100 substances that might be a concern for the health of a developing fetus.  The study examined exposure to various metals (e.g., lead, mercury, arsenic) and many common organic compounds that we might encounter in our daily lives.

Monday, November 28, 2016
Source:
Times Higher Education

Scholars of scientific hype in the modern age typically point their finger at the media, the internet and, above all, the gullibility of the science-illiterate general public. While these elements do clearly play their part, cancer epidemiologist Geoffrey Kabat is more interested in blaming a more unlikely enabler: scientists themselves.

Friday, November 4, 2016
Source:
American Chemistry Council

With so much scientific review of bisphenol A (BPA) having already taken place, you might think that there would be little to learn from further review.  Numerous government bodies around the world have recently reviewed the science on BPA and independently reached similar conclusions on its safety.  But if you thought there’s nothing new under the sun, you’d be wrong.
 
A group of Greek scientists recently published their assessment of BPA in the peer-reviewed scientific literature and concluded that “exposure to BPA does not pose any significant threat according to most realistic exposure scenarios.”  This isn’t exactly a new conclusion.  For example, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), based on its assessment, answers the question “Is BPA safe?” with the straightforward answer “Yes.”  Similarly, the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) concluded that “BPA poses no health risk to consumers of any age group (including unborn children, infants and adolescents) at current exposure levels.”

Wednesday, October 19, 2016
Source:
Science 2.0

Not that many years ago, many reusable food and beverage containers on the market worldwide were made from polycarbonate plastic.  Polycarbonate, which is made from bisphenol A (BPA), is an almost ideal material for these products since its clarity is comparable to glass, making it easy to see what’s inside, and it’s virtually shatter-proof – an important attribute for consumer products that could be dropped.
 
For years though, BPA has attracted considerable attention from scientists, environmental activists and the media.  Now, as a result of that attention, few of these products are made from polycarbonate and a variety of alternative materials are used instead.

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