Tuesday, September 10, 2013
Source:
Plastics News

Long before Apple Inc. officially introduced the new iPhone 5c on Sept. 10, media speculation had guessed that the phone would be the "cheaper" version of a smartphone. But that does not mean that Apple's award-winning designers or engineers wanted anything about the plastic-bodied phone to look or feel cheap. In a video introducing the 5c at Cupertino, Calif.-based Apple's news conference, design chief Jony Ive stressed the high-end manufacturing that goes into the one-piece polycarbonate outer body — from the steel reinforced frame that also serves as the antenna to the high gloss coating.

Wednesday, August 21, 2013
Source:
Science 2.0

That question is particularly relevant this week in light of numerous media articles reporting that exposure to a common chemical is linked to obesity in children and adolescents.  Underlying the articles is a new study on bisphenol A (BPA) published this week in Pediatrics.  The key question is that of causation versus statistical association. The new study is a cross-sectional epidemiology study in which the data analyzed is all collected at the same time.  The data are from the NHANES (National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey) database, which collects extensive health and nutrition information on a nationally representative sample of about 5,000 people each and every year.  Also collected is biomonitoring data from analysis of blood or urine samples for more than 300 chemicals, including BPA.  To be more precise, the analysis measures metabolites of BPA, the significance of which is discussed below.

Tuesday, August 20, 2013
Source:
Forbes

Furthermore, it may alert us to the danger when a paper deals with a topic that has received enormous publicity and caused public alarm, as is the case with BPA.  This may have lowered the threshold for publication.  In other words, to the extent that the reviewers and editor were aware that the paper was weak and its results dubious, they may have over-ridden these reservations on the grounds that the paper was on a topic of great interest.  Finally, publication of this paper may be symptomatic of a lower level of scientific rigor and overall quality prevailing in the area of environmental health, an area where there is great public and media interest, as opposed to other research areas that do not evoke so much interest.

Friday, August 16, 2013
Source:
The Huffington Post

Using vegetables canned at their peak freshness can be a way to enjoy your favourite produce out of season, but most of them will be in cans lined with BPA. There are growing concerns about Bisphenol A's estrogenic properties, and it was recently found that most Canadians have BPA in their blood. Avoid it by using frozen veggies instead.

Thursday, August 8, 2013
Source:
Science 2.0

Last week, a study published in the journal Human Reproduction reported that bisphenol-A (BPA), a compound widely used to make polycarbonate plastic and epoxy resins, altered maturation of human oocytes in vitro.  Specifically, at high concentrations of BPA, oocyte maturation decreased while the incidence of oocyte degeneration increased. In an accompanying press release, the authors suggested that BPA “may cause a significant disruption to the fundamentals of the human reproductive process and may play a role in human infertility.” 

Sunday, June 30, 2013
Source:
U.S. Food and Drug Administration

FDA acknowledges the interest that many consumers have in BPA. FDA has performed extensive research and reviewed hundreds of studies about BPA’s safety. We reassure consumers that current approved uses of BPA in food containers and packaging are safe. Additional research is underway to enhance our understanding of BPA. FDA will take these studies into account as it continues to ensure the safe use of BPA in food packaging.

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