Tuesday, October 11, 2016
Source:
American Chemistry Council

The topic of endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) has been popular lately with many “experts” weighing in with their opinions on everything from the basic definition of EDCs to what to do about them.  With scientific issues like this, the words attributed to Daniel Patrick Moynihan bear repeating:  “everyone is entitled to his own opinion, but not his own facts.”
 
A recent example is an article in the online publication MedPage Today titled “EDCs: An Area of Growing Concern,” and subtitled “Expert: too little testing of BPA, phthalates.”  While the article focused on comments from an “expert,” it would have benefited immensely from some editorial fact-checking.

Wednesday, September 7, 2016
Source:
Science 2.0

With the high level of attention to bisphenol A (BPA) over the years, it’s easy to get the impression that BPA is everywhere and we’re constantly being exposed to high and harmful levels in our daily lives.  You might even have seen BPA referred to as an “everywhere chemical.”   
Adding to the confusion, the media is notorious for attaching pictures of products that contain absolutely no BPA to articles about BPA.  Perhaps the most common examples are pictures of bottled water.  Single-serve bottles containing water, sports drinks or carbonated beverages are almost universally made from a plastic known as polyethylene terephthalate (PET), which has no connection to BPA at all.

Wednesday, August 24, 2016
Source:
American Chemistry Council

Many of today’s consumer products are safer and more effective, thanks to bisphenol A (BPA). Every day we benefit from clear, shatter-resistant polycarbonate plastic and tough epoxy resins, both made from BPA.
From eyeglass lenses to bicycle helmets, and security shields to life-saving medical devices, polycarbonate makes our lives more livable. Almost invisibly, epoxy resin coatings protect metal surfaces from degradation and support food safety by protecting canned foods from contamination.

Monday, August 15, 2016
Source:
American Chemistry Council

The Finnish Institute of Occupational Health and the National Institute for Health and Welfare recently released a report on exposure of hairdressers to several chemicals, one of which was bisphenol A (BPA). First for the bottom line: “According to the results, hairdressers in Finland are not exposed to…bisphenol A…any more than the rest of the population.”

Wednesday, August 3, 2016
Source:
Science 2.0

Based on a recent and fascinating scientific report from Switzerland, you might start to hear demands to eliminate mild mustard from our diet. The Swiss Federal Food Safety and Veterinary Office (FSVO) recently reported that mild mustard contains the chemical bisphenol F (BPF). Remarkably, BPF is not a contaminant introduced from packaging or other sources, but apparently is produced from a component naturally present in mustard seeds when the seeds are processed to make mustard.

Friday, July 15, 2016
Source:
Science 2.0

It is commonly perceived that natural chemicals are safe while manmade substances may be harmful.  These perceptions, however, if not supported by scientific evidence, can result in risk perception gaps that can cause us to worry more than warranted by the evidence.

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