Monday, August 18, 2014
Source:
Science 2.0

There’s an emerging trend, of late, in the seemingly endless saga of the chemical bisphenol A (BPA), which is most commonly used to make polycarbonate plastic and epoxy resins.  Although the BPA saga has not yet become completely passé, much of the attention that had been given to BPA is now focused on alternatives to BPA. Indeed, it seems that BPA-Free is becoming the new BPA.

Wednesday, August 13, 2014
Source:
American Chemistry Matters

While the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) refreshed its bisphenol A (BPA) website last week, the Agency’s stance on the safety of BPA remains the same. As the FDA puts it, “BPA is safe at the current levels occurring in foods” and that “the use of BPA in food packaging and containers is safe.” The more user-friendly approach to communicating the organization’s research about BPA comes after several years of in-depth research and testing to determine if BPA is safe.

Tuesday, July 15, 2014
Source:
Science 2.0

For quite a few years, one of the most popular chemicals for scientific inquiry has been bisphenol A (BPA).  Scientists around the world have been conducting a diverse array of studies aimed at understanding whether BPA poses a risk to human health. Based on the weight of evidence from these many studies, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recently answered the question “Is BPA safe?” with a simple and unambiguous answer - “Yes.”

Thursday, June 19, 2014
Source:
Forbes

Several days ago an article titled “Is Your Shower Curtain Making You Fat?” appeared in the magazine Spry and was then reprinted in the Dodge City Daily Globe.  The article drew readers’ attention to the dangers of endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs), giving 5 examples of chemicals used in everyday consumer products (BPA, phthalates, PVC, PFC’s, and PBDFs).

Thursday, June 12, 2014
Source:
Forbes

And as such, it will come as a surprise to many women concerned about such risks—or at least repeatedly warned about them by the media—that bisphenol A (BPA), a ubiquitous component in cans and plastics, is not on the list, even though there is a section for “endocrine disrupting” chemicals. Instead, the study draws attention to much more potent estrogenic chemicals than BPA, such as Estradiol-17b, a component of oral contraceptives and hormone therapies, which has entered domestic wastewater—and possibly drinking water—via urination. 

Monday, April 28, 2014
Source:
Canadian Food Inspection Agency

As part of the Canadian Food Inspection Agency's (CFIA) routine testing of various food products, a survey released today reported that all of the canned foods tested for Bisphenol A (BPA) were safe to consume. BPA was not detected in 98.5 per cent of canned foods analyzed in this survey. In 2011-12, the CFIA tested 403 canned samples of domestic and imported fruits, vegetables, juices, other beverages, legumes, pasta, and soups for BPA, as these products are likely packaged in cans treated with epoxy coatings. Imported samples came from 15 different countries.

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