Monday, March 3, 2014

The American Chemistry Council (ACC) offers the following comments regarding the study published today in PLOS ONE by the Cincinnati Cancer Center researchers Pheruza Tarapore, et al. Quotes from the following may be attributed to Steven G. Hentges, Ph.D. of ACC’s Polycarbonate/BPA Global Group.

“Cancer touches the lives of far too many, and well-designed research is essential to understanding the causes and cures for cancer. Unfortunately, this very small study fundamentally misinterprets well-understood facts about how BPA is processed in the body, and inappropriately interprets a statistical association to suggest that recent BPA exposure is a key predictor of prostate cancer. The statistical association was based on only 30 study participants, a remarkably small number on which to base claims about an important disease.  Apparently based on the same misunderstanding about how BPA is processed in the body, the authors further suggest that recent exposure to BPA may interfere with the important and well-established PSA test for prostate disease, resulting in misdiagnosis. Scientific study on the potential causes of prostate cancer is important and welcome, but this study is more likely to misguide research on the causes of cancer.

Thursday, February 27, 2014

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration regulates the uses of BPA for food contact applications and polycarbonate is widely used in FDA-regulated medical devices. Since the agency seeks to provide the soundest basis for its regulatory decisions, FDA, in conjunction with the U.S. National Toxicology Program (NTP), designed a robust research program to answer key scientific questions about the safety of BPA.

Tuesday, February 25, 2014

The American Chemistry Council (ACC) offers the following comments regarding the release of the study “Handling of Thermal Receipts as a Source of Exposure to Bisphenol A” published in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) on Feb. 25, 2014. Quotes from the following may be attributed to Steven G. Hentges, Ph.D. of ACC’s Polycarbonate/BPA Global Group.

“While this small-scale study is far too limited to determine if the handling of cash register receipt paper results in significant BPA exposure, it does suggest that consumer exposures to BPA, including occasional contact with thermal paper receipts, are well below safe intake levels established by government regulators around the world. 

Friday, January 17, 2014

The American Chemistry Council (ACC) offers the following comments regarding the release of the European Food Safety Authority’s (EFSA) “Draft Scientific Opinion on the risks to public health related to the presence of bisphenol A (BPA) in foodstuffs.” Quotes from the following may be attributed to Steven G. Hentges, Ph.D. of ACC’s Polycarbonate/BPA Global Group.

“The European Food Safety Authority’s (EFSA) announcement today reaffirms that consumer exposure to BPA, from all sources, poses a low health risk. In this comprehensive review of more than 450 studies addressing potential health hazards, the Authority applied a weight of evidence approach and concluded: ‘the health risk for all population groups is low—including for fetuses, infants, young children and adults."

Monday, January 6, 2014

A recent University of Illinois study attempts to study the effects of BPA exposure on the human prostate. The following statement about this study can be attributed to Steven G. Hentges, Ph.D., of the Polycarbonate/BPA Global Group of the American Chemistry Council.

“This study has very limited relevance to real-life human exposures to BPA as the levels tested are more than 1,000 times higher than typical human exposures. In addition, the validity of the experimental model studied, which involves grafting ‘humanized prostate-like structures’ derived from human and rat tissues into mice and treatment with an artificial mixture of hormones, has not been well established."

Tuesday, October 15, 2013

In response to a study presented Monday at the American Society for Reproductive Medicine’s annual conference in Boston about bisphenol-A (BPA) and miscarriage, the American Chemistry Council released the following statement which can be attributed to Steven G. Hentges, Ph.D. of ACC’s Polycarbonate/BPA Global Group.

“There is no research that shows women’s exposure to BPA causes miscarriage. A recent flurry of media stories has significantly exaggerated the findings of one small-scale study of 114 women that reported a limited ‘statistical association’ between BPA and risk of miscarriage. The study cannot establish – and does not report – any cause-and-effect finding between BPA and miscarriage."

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