Metabolism in Monkeys - Pharmacokinetics of bisphenol A in neonatal and adult rhesus monkeys

AUTHOR
Doerge et al.
PUBLICATION
Toxicology and Applied Pharmacology
DATE
October 1, 2010
FILED UNDER
metabolism

This study on the pharmacokinetics of BPA in monkeys, is conceptually similar to the study on rats mentioned above by Doerge et al. (2010), but of more significance since monkeys are biologically closer to humans. The study found, "These observations imply that any toxicological effect observed in rats from early postnatal exposures to BPA could over-predict those possible in primates of the same age, based on significantly higher internal exposures and overall immaturity at birth." 

At a Glance

What was tested?
This study on pharmacokinetics of BPA in monkeys, is conceptually similar to the study on rats mentioned above by Doeger et al. (2010), but of more significance since monkeys are biologically closer to humans. Four adult rhesus monkeys and six of their infant offspring were orally dosed with BPA to determine how it is processed in the body (also known as the study of pharmacokinetics).
Findings
Adults and neonates efficiently metabolized BPA, converting it to its inactive form, and then rapidly excreted it from the body. Furthermore, “these observations imply that any toxicological effect observed in rats from early postnatal exposures to BPA could over-predict those possible in primates of the same age, based on the significantly hire internal exposures and overall immaturity at birth.”
Study Limitations
Authors note that, despite some evidence in the youngest infant monkeys for reduced kidney function (which impacts excretion of BPA from the body), “there was no evidence for diminished [metabolism] of BPA or differences in any measure of internal exposure to [active] BPA.”
Importance
“The opportunity to evaluate the pharmacokinetics of BPA in neonatal monkeys is particularly valuable because such studies are not ethically acceptable in human infants.”